Articles

Articles in the 2007/May Newsletter

Displaying 9 items

Several years ago His Honour Judge Anthony Thornton QC, during his keynote address at the Annual Adjudication Society, proposed that there should be a code of conduct for adjudicators. He thought that the Adjudication Society was well placed to develop such a code.

Welcome to this bumper edition of the Newsletter. Matt Molloy, who will be well known to many readers, has produced a fascinating article giving a series of invaluable tips to all those involved in adjudications.

In Singapore, adjudication of claims for payment for work and supply of goods and services in the construction industry is facilitated by the Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment Act (“SOP Act”) and its accompanying Regulations, both of which came into operation on 1 April 2005.

The Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment Act 2004 (SOPA) came into operation on 1st April 2005. It is modeled after the New South Wales legislation of the same name. Essentially, the SOPA comprises two parts.

Introduction

We are always seeking to develop the Newsletter as a mark of Adjudication excellence; to disseminate leading opinion and best practice for adjudicators and practitioners; to inform about adjudication in the UK and throughout the world.

A few books provide a short but concise introduction to the many forms of dispute resolution that now exist in the construction industry1. The Engineer’s Dispute Resolution Handbook, edited by Dr Robert Gaitskell QC, does just that.

Adjudication is working. That is the general consensus of the industry and the process is serving users well. Any quick fire system for solving problems will throw up anomolies and the odd bad decision however I ask what process of dispute resolution is deviod of such problems.